WCEC Newsletter Masthead

Summer 2017


IN THIS UPDATE

2016 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards Videos

2017 Affiliates' Forum Presentations and Slides

Featured Webinar


ABOUT THE CENTER:
The Western Cooling Efficiency Center was established in 2007, alongside our UC Davis partner centers, the Energy Efficiency Center, California Lighting Technology Center, Center for Water-Energy Efficiency and the PHEV Research Center through a grant from the California Clean Energy Fund and in partnership with the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program.

WCEC partners with industry stakeholders to stimulate the development of impactful cooling technologies that can enable reduced electrical demand, energy and water consumption in buildings.

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Building Energy Standards Training Videos and Affiliates' Forum Highlights


This issue unveils the finished training videos WCEC created for the California Energy Commission on 2016  Residential Building HVAC Energy Efficiency Standards. These videos are a useful tool for those looking to understand T24 HVAC code for residential buildings.

Please share these with any contractors, teachers, building designers, building inspectors and plans examiners you may know!


Also in this issue is a comprehensive view of WCEC's Affiliates' Forum on May 15th. If you missed the event, you can watch the presentations and download the slides below!


Register now for a webinar on Envelope Sealing hosted by the Center for Energy and Environment. More Details



2016 Residential Building HVAC Energy Efficiency Standards Videos

WCEC has completed the creation of 9 video courses for the California Energy Commission

Course 1: Mandatory, Prescriptive, and Performance Requirements - Understanding the Differences

Course highlights include the following 2016 Energy Standards HVAC system requirements:
• Mandatory
• Prescriptive
• Performance

 

 

Course 2: What's New in 2016

California's Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) must change to keep up with demands for greater efficiency.
Course highlights include the new 2016 Energy Standards requirements for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system alterations and HVAC systems installed in newly constructed low-rise residential buildings.

 

 

Course 3: Mandatory Measures for Heating and Cooling Systems

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) require that heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems satisfy several mandatory measures.
Course highlights include the following 2016 Energy Standards mandatory measures that apply to HVAC system requirements:
• System Sizing
• Equipment Efficiency
• Controls
• Installation

 

 

Course 4: Automatic Setback Thermostats

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) require setback thermostats. These thermostats can reduce energy use and help increase comfort during times that people are home.

Course highlights include the 2016 Energy Standards setback thermostat requirements and exceptions.

 

 

Course 5: Mandatory Measures for Air Distribution Systems

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) has mandatory measures for air distribution systems, which includes ducts and plenums. These systems can impact energy efficiency and comfort.

Course highlights include the 2016 Energy Standards for mandatory measures governing the materials used in an air distribution system, how it operates, and the required tests to ensure energy efficiency.

 

 

Course 6: Indoor Air Quality and Mechanical Ventilation

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) has indoor air quality and ventilation requirements. Homes built today have a much tighter envelope. These requirements help ensure the air in a home is safe for occupants to breathe.

Course highlights include the 2016 Energy Standards indoor air quality and mechanical ventilation requirements.

 

 

Course 7: Prescriptive Method of Compliance

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) has prescriptive requirements, which:
• Are climate zone dependent
• Must comply with mandatory requirements
• Serves as the basis of a building’s standard design
• Determines the time dependent valuation (TDV) energy budget of the proposed design

Course highlights include further explanations of the prescriptive method of compliance, aka prescriptive approach, as it applies to heating, cooling, and air distribution in the 2016 Energy Standards.

 

 

Course 8: Performance Method of Compliance

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) has performance compliance requirements, which: • Are climate zone dependent
• Must comply with mandatory requirements
• Must have a proposed design time dependent valuation (TDV) energy budget less than or equal to the building’s standard design TDV energy budget

Course highlights include further explanations of the performance method of compliance, aka performance approach, as it applies to heating, cooling, and air distribution in the 2016 Energy Standards.

 

 

Course 9: Performance Method of Compliance

California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Standards) has compliance requirements for when heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems wear out and repair is no longer an option.

Course highlights include 2016 Energy Standards requirements for HVAC alterations and changeouts.


WCEC 2017 Affiliates' Forum



The Western Cooling Efficiency Center-UC Davis (WCEC) annual affiliates’ forum brings together HVAC industry stakeholders to discuss recent energy policy affecting the State of California, affiliate member news and developments, and research results published by WCEC. The forum’s goal is to bring together our affiliates to create a diverse and relevant discussion on HVAC energy efficiency, pushing forward toward solutions and facilitating market impacts.


  • Access to and insights from key HVAC industry stakeholders
  • Technology tour of the Western Cooling Efficiency Center’s Laboratory
  • Learn about new technologies, programs and policies that can save your company energy and inform energy investment strategies


WCEC Year-In-Review Celebrating 10 Years



Mark Modera, WCEC Director

Western Cooling Efficiency Director, Mark Modera, highlights some notable achievements from the Center's past 10 year history. Also included are some current research projects.



Program Unification Panel: SDGE Future of Upstream HVAC Programs


Paul Thomas, HVAC Strategy Lead, San Diego Gas and Electric

Discussion of the upcoming changes to energy efficiency programs in California, namely, that Utility-based programs will now be run statewide, and not siloed to each individual utility district.



Program Unification Panel: Third Party Programs Perspective


Paul Kyllo, Director, CLEAResult

Third Party Programs implement much of the energy efficiency standards set by the Energy Commission and the Utilities. CLEAResult's Paul Kyllo offers us insight into what has and has not worked with large scale energy efficiency programs through the lens of a large program implementer.



Program Unification Panel: Upstream Rebate Programs


Richard Lord, Senior Fellow, Carrier

An overview of upstream rebate programs, how they are used by utilities, what manufacturers think of these programs and the impact they have on both manufacturers and distributors.



Future of Refrigerants Panel: A Manufacturer's Experience


Chun-Cheng Piao, Vice President of Technology Alliances, Daikin

Dr. Piao explains some of the new refrigerant candidates researched at Daikin, shows test results and discusses the pros and cons of these new refrigerants, the market response and a brief discussion regarding the potential safety changes needed for some of these refrigerants to meet flammability code.



Future of Refrigerants Panel: Past, Present and Future Refrigerants


Steve Kujak, Director for Next Generation Refrigerant Research, Ingersoll Rand

Steve Kujak, Ingersoll Rand's Director for Next Generation Refrigerant Research gives us a brief history of refrigerants, what we currently use, and the challenges in finding suitable, low-GWP refrigerants of the future.



Future of Refrigerants Panel: ARB Update on HFC Emissions Reduction Efforts


Glenn Gallagher, Air Pollution Specialist, California Air Resources Board

The future of refrigerants is low-GWP (global warming potential). With the Kigali Amendment guaranteeing a complete reduction of HFC refrigerant supply, can California meet its emissions goals by 2030? What are the next steps to reducing HFC's in refrigerants and what can regulatory agencies do to further this goal?



A Universal Model for Hybrid HVAC Equipment in Building Energy Simulations


Jonathan Woolley, Associate Engineer, Western Cooling Efficiency Center

Jonathan Woolley, WCEC Engineer, walks through the process of this research and explains the impetus for creating such a tool as a way to further advance energy efficient hybrid-evaporative technologies throughout California.



State and Utility Technology Development Programs: California Energy Commission


David Hungerford, Senior Scientist, California Energy Commission

David Hungerford, Senior Scientist at the California Energy Commission (CEC) explains the Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) and upcoming changes to the program and its potential impacts on California.



State and Utility Technology Development Programs: Southern California Edison


Jerine Ahmed, Lead Engineer, Southern California Edison

Increasing grid complexity due to much larger variety of energy sources and new energy consumption like the electrification of transportation and an evolving energy efficiency and demand response role in demand-side programs. Jerine Ahmed, Lead Engineer for Emerging Technologies at SCE also looks into the role of Emerging Technology programs and the future for statewide Emerging Technology program administration.


Webinar Series: New Technology for Efficient Multifamily Building Envelope Sealing (Hosted by Center for Energy and Environment)

Wednesday, June 14th 11:00 am – 12:00 pm CST


Register here

Why Tune In?
Tight envelopes have become standard for Minnesota single family homes, but these construction practices have not yet reached much of the multifamily sector. Multifamily buildings have many of the same leakage paths as houses, but they include additional paths hidden in walls or other cavities that are difficult to seal with conventional methods.

Researchers at UC Davis Western Cooling Efficiency Center have developed an aerosol sealant to seal leaks in building walls, floors and ceilings. The process has the potential to be more effective and convenient than conventional methods for sealing envelopes, due to less effort and greater leak coverage.

A study recently completed by the Center for Energy and Environment and the Western Cooling Efficiency Center demonstrated the abilities of this new technology in multifamily applications. The leakage was reduced by 67% to 94% in 18 new construction units and by an average of 68% for nine existing units. The project also used EnergyPlus models to estimate reductions in space heating energy use, air infiltration, and air flows between units. This sealing process was recently commercialized by Aeroseal, so findings are increasingly relevant for design and field professionals working on multifamily and single-family projects.

Join us for this webinar that will outline the study field findings as well as results of cost-effectiveness and recommendations on how utilities and contractors can take advantage of this new sealing application.

Read more about the project here.

Who is this Webinar for?
• Utility commercial conservation program managers
• Mechanical design engineers
• Building scientists
• Architects
• Insulation contractors
• General contractor project managers and estimators